Should older people live with their

Should old man live with young people together, or should they live in the clubs for old men? With the development of society, we have stepped into an old-man world. Many countries and governments are much concerned about the situation confronting us, especially how old men can live a happy life. Under this circumstance, many old-man clubs bamboo up with the view to providing old men a better place to settle down.

Should older people live with their

Messenger Demographers frequently remind us that the United States is a rapidly aging country. From towe expect that the ageand-over population will more than double in sizefrom about 40 to 82 million. More than one in five residents will be in their later years.

While these numbers result in lively debates on issues such as social security or health care spending, they less often provoke discussion on where our aging population should live and why their residential choices matter. But this growing share of older Americans will contribute to the proliferation of buildings, neighborhoods and even entire communities occupied predominantly by seniors.

It may be difficult to find older and younger populations living side by side together in the same places. Is this residential segregation by age a good or a bad thing?

As an environmental gerontologist and social geographer, I have long argued that it is easier, less costly, and more beneficial and enjoyable to grow old in some places than others.

The happiness of our elders is at stake. In my recent book, Aging in the Right PlaceI conclude that when older people live predominantly with others their own age, there are far more benefits than costs.

Why do seniors tend to live apart from other age groups? Strong residential inertia forces are in play. They are understandably reluctant to move from their familiar settings where they have strong emotional attachments and social ties.

So they stay put.

Older people should be supported to carry on living at home | Social Care Network | The Guardian

In the vernacular of academics, they opt to age in place. These residential enclaves of old are now found throughout our cities, suburbs and rural counties. In some locales with economies that have changed for the worse, these older concentrations are further explained by the wholesale exit of younger working populations looking for better job prospects elsewhere — leaving the senior population behind.

Even when older people decide to move, they often avoid locating near the young. The Fair Housing Amendments Act of allows certain housing providers to discriminate against families with children. The best-known examples are those active adult communities offering golf, tennis and recreational activities catering to the hedonistic lifestyles of older Americans.

Finally, another smaller group of relocating elders transition to low-rent senior apartment buildings made possible by various federally and state-funded housing programs. They move to seek relief from the intolerably high housing costs of their previous residences.

Is this a bad thing? Those advocates who bemoan the inadequate social connections between our older and younger generations view these residential concentrations as landscapes of despair.

In their perhaps idyllic worlds, old and young generations should harmoniously live together in the same buildings and neighborhoods. Older people would care for the children and counsel the youth.

Should older people live with their

The younger groups would feel safer, wiser and respectful of the old. The older group would feel fulfilled and useful in their roles of caregivers, confidants and volunteers. In question is whether these enriched social outcomes merely represent idealized visions of our pasts. A less generous interpretation for why critics oppose these congregations of old is that they make the problems faced by an aging population more visible and thus harder to ignore.

Over the course of our lives, we typically gravitate to others who are at similar stages in life as ourselves. Consider summer camps, university dormitories, rental buildings geared to millennials or neighborhoods with lots of young families.When older people live predominantly with others their own age, there are far more benefits than costs.

Should older Americans live in . Jan 03,  · I see many older people abandoned by their children and they may spend the rest of their life in nursing home. There are thousands of parents who live alone in their old age and I can image how difficult it is. In their perhaps idyllic worlds, old and young generations should harmoniously live together in the same buildings and neighborhoods.

Older people would care for the children and counsel the youth. One of the topics in daily life is whether or not the older people should live with their adult children.

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My answer is the question is that it is better for them not to. Earlier this year, Le Monde attempted to chronicle the rise of this trend in France, a task that proved difficult because “middle-aged people who live with their parents are often ashamed.

Apr 04,  · How to Respect Older People. That’s especially true for elderly people who live in a nursing or retirement home. Take time out of your schedule to visit with the older people in your life as often as you can, so they know that they’re still important to you. Because of their experience, older people can offer up a wealth 77%(75).

Should older Americans live in places segregated from the young?